TB’s Ticking Time Bomb?

Harvard Medicine News spoke to Dr. Jennifer Furin to learn more about the situation in the island province of Daru, just north of Australia in the southwestern Pacific.

HMN: What’s happening on Daru?

JF: Currently, on Daru Island in Papua New Guinea, there is a significant and ongoing outbreak of MDR-TB. It is spreading throughout the country and could possibly move to Australia.

HMN: How does it compare to other outbreaks globally?

JF: Conservative estimates show that 1 percent of the population of Daru is sick with MDR-TB. This translates to about 150 cases per year in a population of 15,000. As a point of comparison, an outbreak on nearby Chuuk Island, one that the CDC was able to get under control, had 26 cases in a population of 108,000.

In one community in South Africa, Khayelitsha, there are about 200 MDR-TB cases a year, with a population of about 400,000 and an HIV prevalence above 20 percent.

Since Daru has almost no HIV—which greatly increases the risk of contracting MDR-TB—the number of cases there is even more staggering.

 

Read the rest of the story, here.

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