Preventing deaths from HIV/AIDS in Zimababwe

  I read with interest the recent NEJM Case Records of the Massachusetts General Hospital, entitled “A 39-Year-Old Zimbabwean Man with a Severe Headache.” This patient presented with AIDS, a CD4 count of 31, and cryptococcal meningitis, and fortunately survived despite a lack of flucytosine (due to cost) and an antiquated HIV regimen which included stavudine and neviripine. My main comment is that the patient was … Continue reading Preventing deaths from HIV/AIDS in Zimababwe

Bearing Witness: World AIDS Day 2016

I’ve wanted to be an HIV doctor since I was a teenager, and finally I have achieved my goal. Recently I completed my infectious diseases fellowship and am now an attending physician at Massachusetts General Hospital. And yet, World AIDS Day always brings sorrow, because of the memories of my patients who have died of this dreadful virus. Lovely people, in Philadelphia, San Diego, Gabarone, Maputo, … Continue reading Bearing Witness: World AIDS Day 2016

The contributions of Steve Lawn to the science, advocacy and policy of HIV-associated TB

  Steve Lawn, one of the great doctors and outstanding scientists of his time, died on September 23, 2016 from an aggressive cerebral glioblastoma multiforme (brain tumor) that he had battled with for 2 years. Despite repeated chemotherapy and progressive disease, he bravely continued to work and teach up until 2 months before his death. At the time of his death, he was Professor of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine at the … Continue reading The contributions of Steve Lawn to the science, advocacy and policy of HIV-associated TB

Knowledge of HIV Status and Seropositivity after a Recently Negative Test in Malawi

Today, I am at the national scientific meeting for the Centers for AIDS Research. One of the most important issues is the need to dramatically increase the uptake of HIV testing and lifesaving ART.  Check out our article, “Knowledge of HIV Status and Seropositivity after a Recently Negative Test in Malawi,” just published online today . There is an urgent need for HIV advocacy, getting rid of … Continue reading Knowledge of HIV Status and Seropositivity after a Recently Negative Test in Malawi

CROI 2016: Why is ART so much better today?

I’m not attending CROI (too much else going on) but I can’t resist following closely from afar. Dr. Carlos Del Rio along with many others has been live-tweeting the meeting. One tweet he wrote was below, referencing Dr. Joseph Eron‘s lecture. This exchange made me pause and reflect. Who gets the high quality drugs like dolutegravir? It certainly isn’t rural Mozambicans.  Our world values people who have money. … Continue reading CROI 2016: Why is ART so much better today?

Kenneth Cole at CROI

The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) started yesterday here in Boston. This is the main HIV scientific conference. Follow the action on Twitter if you aren’t attending in person. Kenneth Cole gave the keynote lecture and apparently joked about scientist/physician fashion, saying that problem “may be harder to cure than HIV.” (I wasn’t in attendance and learned about Mr. Cole’s address from texts/Twitter). As a stereotypical frumpy … Continue reading Kenneth Cole at CROI