On Children

Today, I thought I’d share a poem by Kahlil Gibran from The Prophet. Gibran was born January 6, 1883, in Bsharri, Lebanon and arrived here in Boston in 1895 at the age of 12. He lived in the South End and enjoyed the city’s theater, opera, and art galleries. This poem is in the public domain. On Children And a woman who held a babe against her bosom said, Speak to us … Continue reading On Children

Caribbean’s Lyrical Voice and Nobel Laureate

Derek Walcott, whose intricately metaphorical poetry captured the physical beauty of the Caribbean, the harsh legacy of colonialism, and the complexities of living and writing in two cultural worlds, bringing him a Nobel Prize in Literature, died Friday at his home near Gros Islet in St. Lucia. He was 87. In the poem “Islands,” from the collection “In a Green Night,” he wrote: I seek, As climate … Continue reading Caribbean’s Lyrical Voice and Nobel Laureate

The masks we wear: authenticity, vulnerability, and innovation in TB

The current issue of the International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases presents early and exploratory efforts to change ingrained habits in health care facilities. Research papers demonstrate that the masks that we wear include not only N95 respirators, but also the masks of professional distance, stoicism, authoritative knowledge, and, in the case of tuberculosis (TB) researchers, a studied neutrality or ‘objectivity’ toward this work. I’d … Continue reading The masks we wear: authenticity, vulnerability, and innovation in TB